Donald Trump’s face gives away his leadership style

  • Trump’s masculine, older-looking and wide face reveals his leadership skills
  • Suggests he will be a dominate, aggressive and powerful leader
  • Traits could lead to conflict with other leaders who are also dominate
  • Features also suggest person exhibits unethical behavior  

Donald J Trump made an oath to be ‘the People’s President’ today, but many Americans are still worried about what the next four years will bring.

However, new research reveals that the way Trump will lead the country is written all over his face.

Because he has a masculine, older-looking and wide face, experts say he will likely be a dominant, powerful and aggressive leader – but warn these features also mean the person exhibits unethical behavior. 

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Donald J Trump made an oath to be ‘the People’s President’ today, but with low approval ratings, it seems Americans are worried about what the next four years will bring. However, new research suggests the way Trump will lead the country is written all over his face

TRUMP’S FACE 

Cass Business School found that President Donald Trump’s leaderships skills can be determined by his facial features.

Because he has a masculine, older-looking and wide face, experts say he will likely be a dominant and powerful leader for the US.

Researchers suggests these type of features mean the person is a better negotiator and financially successful.

However, they are also linked to darker outcomes such as unethical behavior and exploitation of trust of others

A masculine face, which Trump was found to have, is often seen as dominate and suggests the individual thrives in competitive settings – like wartime.

On the other hand, masculine faces are found to appear less trustworthy and are not preferred in cooperative settings such as times of peace.

The findings come from Cass Business School, which is part of a review that examines a diverse range of fields including endocrinology, genetics, psychology and psychiatry to assess the current state of leadership research and to identify what individual factors determine leadership success.

The team chose President Trump’s face for analysis, which was determined to be masculine, older-looking and wide – factors that may imply his leadership skills.

‘Those who have higher ratio, like Trump, are more likely to be more aggressive, dominant and powerful, said Dr Oguz Ali Acar, an assistant professor at Cass Business School.

‘They are better negotiators and are financially more successful.’

Researches found a positive link between the width of a male CEO’s face relative to his height and the financial performance of the firm.

On the other hand, these facial features are also associated with darker outcomes such as unethical behavior and exploitation of the trust of others.

A masculine face, which Trump was found to have, is often seen as dominate and suggests the individual thrives in competitive settings – like wartime.

However, masculine faces are found to be less trustworthy and are not preferred in cooperative settings such as times of peace.

And Dr. Acar believes the increased threat of terrorism around the world may have helped Trump winning the presidential election.

He also believes that although Trump looks older and is associate with competence, this type of leader is not preferred in times of change.

President Trump’s face with high width-to-height ratio (fWHR) may also have an impact on his relations with international leaders.


Researches found a positive link between the width of a male CEO’s face relative to his height and the financial performance of the firm. On the other hand, these facial features are also associated with darker outcomes such as unethical behavior and exploitation of trust of others

‘The dominance associated with fWHR may be a double-edged sword,’ said Dr Acar.

‘On the one hand, it can be an asset for the US for example by securing a better deal in international negotiations.’

‘On the other hand, it can lead to conflicts – or even a foreign policy crisis – when the other leader(s) are also dominant.’

TRUMP’S PSYCHOPATHIC TRAITS

Experts had wondered if Donald Trump exhibit similar traits of other historical leaders. 

A recent study into psychopathic traits reveals that Trump ranks above Adolf Hitler and below Saddam Hussein. 

Oxford University’s Dr, Kevin Dutton has been exploring the psychopathic traits of the candidates and other historical figures using a standard psychometric tool, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory – Revised (PPI-R), reports Scientific American Mind.


While President Trump’s faces says he will be  a powerful leader, another study found that he has psychopathic traits similar to Adolf Hitler

Trump was found to be on par with Hitler, the German leader of the Nazi Party who was blamed for the genocide of millions of Jews, and Idi Amin, president of Uganda who racially persecuted and executed his people without hesitation.

Trump, however, was found to outscore Clinton altogether, but the most was in Fearless Dominance, which is associated with successful presidencies.

However, The Donald also ranked high in ‘self-centered impulsivity’, the set of traits considered negative. 

‘In addition, trust issues associated with fWHR may inhibit forming cooperative relationships.’

Dr Acar said Trump’s fWHR may also be relevant to his dual role as a businessman.

‘It is currently unclear what Trump plans to about his business interests,’ he explained.

‘However, based on his facial characteristics alone; one could expect to Trump to keep as much control as possible over his organisation and not to compromise.’

‘An aggressive and dominant approach towards those who oppose this may be expected.’


A masculine face, which Trump was found to have, is often seen as dominate and suggests the individual thrives in competitive settings – like wartime. And experts believe the increased threat of terrorism around the world may have helped Trump winning the presidential election

‘The tendencies of unethical behavior and exploitation of trust (that are associated with high fWHR) make this conflict of interest an area of concern.’

Dr Acar said our leaders can have a powerful effect on us so it is important to understand exactly what makes them tick.

‘How we select, support and follow the right leader, whether it is in the workplace or on the political stage, has always been an important question because of the impact leaders have on the day-to-day lives, well-being and survival of our collective groups, societies and organisations,’ he said.

 







Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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