Footage reveals fish filmed at record depth of 8,178 m

  • The view from 8,178 m deep (5 miles) exceeds the previous record by 26 meters
  • The team spotted unusual deep-sea creatures, including the glowing ‘snailfish’
  • To capture the view, researchers used a lander equipped with 4K video cameras

A camera-rig operated by a team aboard the Japanese research vessel Kairei has captured the deepest footage yet of life in the Mariana Trench, revealing a look at a glowing ‘snailfish’ 26,000 feet beneath the surface.

In the record-breaking observation, the researchers spotted a slew of unusual deep-sea organisms, lured in by the mackerel they’d strapped to the rig – and, after over 17 hours recording the scene, a snailfish showed up, appearing to smile at the camera.

The remarkable view from 8,178 meters deep (5 miles) exceeds the previous record by 26 meters, allowing researchers to peer into a region nearing the deepest point fish can survive.

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In the record-breaking observation, the researchers spotted a slew of unusual deep-sea organisms, lured in by the mackerel they¿d strapped to the rig ¿ and, after over 17 hours recording the scene, a snailfish showed up, appearing to smile at the camera

In the record-breaking observation, the researchers spotted a slew of unusual deep-sea organisms, lured in by the mackerel they’d strapped to the rig – and, after over 17 hours recording the scene, a snailfish showed up, appearing to smile at the camera

HOW THEY DID IT 

To capture the deepest view yet, the researchers used a newly designed compact hadal-lander equipped with 4K video cameras.

And, using conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors on the lander, they were able to determine just how deep the device had traveled.

The researchers used mackerel, placed in front of the lander frame, as bait for the deep-sea creatures, then waited to see what appeared.

Footage was recorded at 7,498 meters, and at 8,178. 

The effort, led by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) recorded footage at two depths in the Mariana Trench: at 7,498 meters, and at 8,178.

The researchers used mackerel, placed in front of the lander frame, as bait for the deep-sea creatures, then waited to see what appeared.

Amphipods were the first to show up at both depths, according to the team.

Then, at 7, 498 meters, snailfish appeared 3 hours and 37 minutes later, increasing in numbers over time.

The team also spotted a giant amphipod at 7, 498 meters. 

The researchers used mackerel, placed in front of the lander frame, as bait for the deep-sea creatures, then waited to see what appeared

Amphipods were the first to show up at both depths, according to the team. Then, at 7, 498 meters, snailfish appeared 3 hours and 37 minutes later, increasing in numbers over time

Researchers used mackerel, placed in front of the lander frame, as bait for the deep-sea creatures. Amphipods were the first to show up at both depths. Then, at 7, 498 meters, snailfish appeared 3 hours and 37 minutes later, increasing in numbers over time

At the deeper site, the snailfish were far scarcer.

While countless amphipods can be seen feasting on the mackerel in the footage at this depth, it took 17 hours and 37 minutes for a single snailfish to show up.

According to the researchers, the snailfish observed in the new footage is what’s known as the Mariana snailfish.

These were previously known to exist between depths of 6,198–8,076 m.

Another type of snailfish, known as the Ethereal snailfish, lives between 7,939–8,145 m.

The effort, led by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) recorded footage at two depths in the Mariana Trench: at 7,498 meters, and at 8,178

The effort, led by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) recorded footage at two depths in the Mariana Trench: at 7,498 meters, and at 8,178

THE WORLD’S DEEPEST TRENCH

The Mariana Trench is the deepest part of the world’s oceans located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. 

The trench is 1,580 miles (2,550 km) long but has an average width of only 43 miles (69 km).

The distance between the surface of the ocean and the trench’s deepest point, the Challenger Deep is nearly 7 miles (11 km).

Director James Cameron became the first solo diver to reach the bottom of Challenger Deep in 2012. 

The Mariana Trench (marked on the map) is the deepest part of the world's oceans. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. The trench is 1,580 miles (2,550 km) long but has an average width of just 43 miles (69 km)

The Mariana Trench (marked on the map) is the deepest part of the world’s oceans. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. The trench is 1,580 miles (2,550 km) long but has an average width of just 43 miles (69 km)

Observing organisms this deep has long been a challenge, as ‘extremely high pressure in deep-sea trenches has prevented sampling as well as video recording,’ JAMSTEC explains.

To capture the deepest view yet, the researchers used a newly designed compact hadal-lander equipped with 4K video cameras.

And, using conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors on the lander, they were able to determine just how deep the device had traveled.

Moving forward, the researchers plan to collect and analyze samples in efforts to better understand life 5 miles beneath the surface. 

To capture the deepest view yet, the researchers used a newly designed compact hadal-lander equipped with 4K video cameras. And, using conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors on the lander, they were able to determine just how deep the device had traveled

To capture the deepest view yet, the researchers used a newly designed compact hadal-lander equipped with 4K video cameras. And, using conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors on the lander, they were able to determine just how deep the device had traveled






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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