Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey says firm ‘thinking about’ allowing users to edit tweets

  • Dorsey asked: what’s the most important thing you want to see Twitter improve?
  • Most requested feature ‘today & always’ was ability to edit tweets after posting
  • This could be done through a ‘five-minute window’ or by showing edit history
  • But, many argue that the original poster could change the meaning at later time

Ahead of the new year, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey asked followers for suggestions on how to improve the platform – and many asked for the ability to edit tweets after they’ve been published.

The idea has floated among users for years, but this week, Dorsey responded that a form of the feature is ‘definitely needed.’

While it may seem useful to be able to quickly fix a typo or any other embarrassing error, many have pointed out that this could come with a number of repercussions, potentially allowing someone to change the entire meaning of a tweet after others have shared it.

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Ahead of the new year, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey asked followers for suggestions on how to improve the platform – and many asked for the ability to edit tweets after they’ve been published

HOW IT WOULD WORK 

The CEO suggested two possible types of edits that could work.

One could give users a brief window of time after the post was sent – five minutes, for example – to make any corrections.

The other method would work similarly to Facebook’s editing feature, which allows users to change what they wrote at any time, but shows a log of the changes.

This would ensure the edits don’t go ‘off the public record,’ Dorsey explained.

‘Following in the footsteps of Brian Chesky: what’s the most important thing you want to see Twitter improve or create in 2017?’ Dorsey (@jack) wrote yesterday.

Thousands of people have replied so far, and the majority requested the ability to edit tweets.

When one user wrote that it should be enabled for verified accounts, Dorsey responded, that ‘a form of edit is def needed. But for everyone, not just those w badges.’

The CEO suggested two possible types of edits that could work, according to Engadget.

One could give users a brief window of time after the post was sent – five minutes, for example – to make any corrections.

The other method would work similarly to Facebook’s editing feature, which allows users to amend what they wrote at any time, but shows a log of the changes.


Thousands of people have replied so far, and the majority requested the ability to edit tweets


When one user wrote that it should be enabled to verified accounts, Dorsey responded, that ‘a form of edit is def needed. But for everyone, not just those w badges’

This would ensure the edits don’t go ‘off the public record,’ Dorsey explained.

Still, many users have pointed out that even these options come with risks.

One user, Justyn Howard, tweeted at Dorsey, ‘please don’t allow editing. History shouldn’t be rewritten. Delete is enough. Context changing post-fact is dangerous.’

Responding to another user who asked why a person might be against the 5-minute window, Howard further explained, ‘I say ‘do you like to eat pizza’, you reply ‘yes’ 3 minutes later. I change pizza to babies. Wouldn’t you rather I deleted it?’


While it may seem useful to be able to quickly fix a typo or any other embarrassing error, many have pointed out that this change could come with a number of repercussions, potentially allowing someone to change the entire meaning of a tweet after others have shared it

And, if dozens of users had already liked or retweeted the post before the change was made, even a revision history might not protect them, as it may not indicate which version those people responded to.

Instead, those arguing against the edit feature suggest users continue revising their tweets the way they already do – deleting it entirely, and rewriting the post.

Users also had a number of other suggestions to improve Twitter next year, including bookmarks to relocate favourite tweets, according to Engadget.

And, many asked for stronger measures to crack down on online abuse – which Dorsey noted is the company’s ‘top priority.’

TWITTER FINALLY LAUNCHES 360 DEGREE LIVE VIDEOS

The feature allows users to interact and get behind the scenes of live broadcasts on videos marked with a ‘LIVE 360’ badge.

Users can move the angle of their view by either moving their phones or swiping their screens.

As with other live videos, on the desktop, you can click and drag the screen to rotate the camera.

 

 








Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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