NASA satellite sees stunning partial solar eclipse

  • Animation shows lunar transit on May 25, as moon blocked 89 percent of the sun
  • The transit lasted nearly an hour, and took place between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT
  • As the moon has no atmosphere, the view shows a ‘crisp’ look at its horizon

A stunning new animation reveals the moment the moon crosses in front of the sun during a partial solar eclipse.

The phenomenon was captured on May 25 by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), during a lunar transit that lasted nearly an hour.

During this time, scientists say the moon covered roughly 89 percent of the sun, revealing a ‘crisp’ view of the lunar horizon.

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The phenomenon was captured on May 25 by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), during a lunar transit that lasted nearly an hour. The animation reveals the moon’s path as it crossed in front of the sun

NASA’S SOLAR PROBE PLUS MISSION

NASA has revealed a plan to send a robot to the sun in 2018 to help understand space weather.

The spacecraft will swoop within 4 million miles of the sun’s surface next year- facing extremes in heat and radiation.

This will bring it seven times closer to the sun’s surface than any spacecraft before it.

To survive its mission, the spacecraft will need to withstand temperatures outside the spacecraft of 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,377 degrees Celsius).

It will be made of a 4.5 inch-thick (11.43 cm) carbon-composite shield.

The transit took place between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT, according to NASA.

It comes just months before another lunar transit will cause a rare total solar eclipse to be seen from Earth, when the moon will completely block out the face of the sun.

But, when this phenomenon is observed by SDO on August 21, its perspective will see the moon just ‘barely hide part of the sun.’

According to NASA, the rugged surface of the moon plays a role in the way the light is seen from Earth when it crosses in front of the sun.

‘The moon’s rough, craggy terrain influences what we see on Earth during a total solar eclipse,’ NASA explains.

‘Light rays stream through lunar valleys along the moon’s horizon and form Baily’s beads, bright points of light that signal the beginning and end of totality.’

According to NASA, the rugged surface of the moon plays a role in the way the light is seen from Earth when it crosses in front of the sun

According to NASA, the rugged surface of the moon plays a role in the way the light is seen from Earth when it crosses in front of the sun

‘The moon’s surface also shapes the shadow, called the umbra, that races across the path of totality: Sunlight peeks through valleys and around mountains, adding edges to the umbra.

‘These edges warp even more as they pass over Earth’s own mountain ranges.’

The total solar eclipse this summer will pass from coast-to-coast through the continental United States for the first time in nearly a century.

WHERE TO SEE THIS SUMMER’S TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE

The path of totality will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to Charleston South Carolina.

To find out exactly when and where it will be visible, visit NASA’s interactive map, and click on a city along the path.

Totality will cross the US from west to east, beginning at Lincoln Beach, Oregon, where totality will occur at 10:16 a.m. (PDT).

It will the US over roughly an hour and a half, passing through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.

It will end near Charleston, South Carolina, at 2:48 p.m. (EDT), according to NASA.

The August 21 event will be visible to millions of people as it crosses through 14 states, with the path of totality stretching from Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to Charleston, South Carolina.

And, a partial solar eclipse will be visible all across North America, and even in parts of South America, Africa, and Europe, according to NASA.

While the totality itself will last just a few minutes, the eclipse – from start to finish – will span more than an hour as the moon moves in and out of the sun’s path, giving rise to a series of crescents along the way.

NASA has recently amped up its plans to study the sun, and this event will give scientists a rare chance to observe the elusive corona, the sun’s outer atmosphere, which is only available to the naked eye during a total solar eclipse.





Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

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